Schlagwort-Archive: whitestone river

Presseartikel über meine Kanutouren in Kanada und Alaska

Mit Helikopter und Kanu zum Miner-River 1988
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 1/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 2/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 3/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 4/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 5/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 6/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 7/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 8/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 9/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 10/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 11/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 12/13
Vierteiliger Magazinbericht über eine meiner Kanutouren im Yukon-Territory 1979 – Teil 13/13
Bericht über meine Kanutour auf dem Peel River von der Ogilvie-Bridge bis Fort McPherson 1981 – Teil 1/5
Bericht über meine Kanutour auf dem Peel River von der Ogilvie-Bridge bis Fort McPherson 1981 – Teil 2/5
Bericht über meine Kanutour auf dem Peel River von der Ogilvie-Bridge bis Fort McPherson 1981 – Teil 3/5
Bericht über meine Kanutour auf dem Peel River von der Ogilvie-Bridge bis Fort McPherson 1981 – Teil 4/5
Bericht über meine Kanutour auf dem Peel River von der Ogilvie-Bridge bis Fort McPherson 1981 – Teil 5/5
Mein Artikel über unsere Kanutour auf dem Peel River in der Welt am Sonntag 1981
Mit dem Wasserflugzeug und Kanu zum Quellgebiet des Stewart Rivers 1991 – Teil 1/6
Mit dem Wasserflugzeug und Kanu zum Quellgebiet des Stewart Rivers 1991 – Teil 2/6
Mit dem Wasserflugzeug und Kanu zum Quellgebiet des Stewart Rivers 1991 – Teil 3/6
Mit dem Wasserflugzeug und Kanu zum Quellgebiet des Stewart Rivers 1991 – Teil 4/6
Mit dem Wasserflugzeug und Kanu zum Quellgebiet des Stewart Rivers 1991 – Teil 5/6
Mit dem Wasserflugzeug und Kanu zum Quellgebiet des Stewart Rivers 1991 – Teil 6/6
“Ärztliches Reise- und Kulturjournal” – Teil 1/2
“Ärztliches Reise- und Kulturjournal” – Teil 2/2
Bericht über einen Cross-Country-Zugang zu den Quellwassern des Whitestone Rivers 1985 – Teil 1/2
Eine ausführliche Wegbeschreibung finden Sie hier.
Bericht über einen Cross-Country-Zugang zu den Quellwassern des Whitestone Rivers 1985 – Teil 2/2
Eine ausführliche Wegbeschreibung finden Sie hier.
Bericht über einen Cross-Country-Zugang zu den Quellwassern des Whitestone Rivers 1985,
Welt am Sonntag vom 5. April 1992 – Teil 1/2
Eine ausführliche Wegbeschreibung finden Sie hier.
Bericht über einen Cross-Country-Zugang zu den Quellwassern des Whitestone Rivers 1985,
Welt am Sonntag vom 5. April 1992 – Teil 2/2
Eine ausführliche Wegbeschreibung finden Sie hier.
Das ZDF-Team – mit mir als Guide – vorübergehend verkleidet in Dawson City 1989:
von links oben: Jo Junk, Dieter Kronzucker, Kevin Scheckel, Danny Hildebrand,
Hans J. Peters, Sabine Kronzucker, Manfred Zschiek, Hermann Feicht 1989
SOS: Der an sich friedliche Whitestone River zeigt sich bei Hochwasser von seiner schlimmsten Seite 1997 – Teil 1/4
SOS: Der an sich friedliche Whitestone River zeigt sich bei Hochwasser von seiner schlimmsten Seite 1997 – Teil 2/4
Unser Notruf, aufgefangen am anderen Ende des Kontinents in Trenton USA – Teil 3/4
Der Rettungsauftrag an die Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Dawson City – Teil 4/4
Aus dem Hamburger Abendblatt vom 17. Juli 1985
Mein Bericht über die Kanu-Tour auf dem Big Salmon River 1995 in der Welt am Sonntag
Ekeltest in Dawson City 1989 – mit Zertifizierung!
Vor Begeisterung im Laufe der Jahre drei Mal den Chilkoot Pass überquert
Eine Woche Survivalkurs im Hürtgenwald 1987
„Türöffner“ für diverse Hilfen wie z.B. günstige Transfers in Kanada, Sonderflugzeug außerhalb eines festen Flugplans von Old Crow nach Whitehorse oder Upgradings auf Businessclass bei Transatlantikflügen usw.

Access to the Whitestone River

Orientation for more advanced and well trained adventurers (Explore The Backcountry)

Those who would like to experience the absolute untouched bush/wilderness without the help of a helicopter, by crossing through the nameless spring waters of the upper Whitestone River/Yukon Territory by foot. Designation of the journey would be the Bering Sea after passing through the Porcupine and the Yukon River (not suitable for everyone).

Danny Hildebrand

Dr. Bruno Benischek

by Danny Hildebrand and Dr. Bruno Benischek
The Whitestone River and the Upper Porcupine River are ideal to those who are relatively experienced in paddling; ideal to those who look for the totally untouched wilderness on the one hand and who are physically able to cope with the strains of hiking alone through the bush to the sources of the Whitestone on the other hand; that is to those who are willing to undertake such a trip of eight days under the before mentioned conditions.

What is extremely dangerous with this tour is the fact that you are totally alone in the untouched wilderness without any possibility of calling for or getting help (today it is possible to take a PLB with you). Hence, for safety’s sake, this tour is recommended to be undertaken by at least four persons and dissuaded for learners. The experienced wanderer and canoeist, on the other hand, will meet with numerous unforgettable adventures as well as the satisfaction of having done something extraordinary, always providing that he planned the tour thoroughly before. He will be rewarded by clear and fast water without proper rapids, untouched nature with a variety of wild animals as well as fine weather during most of the tour. A crew of to men (us in 1985) in a 16 foot long canoe needed 33 days to get from Dempster Highway to Old Crow, but we were not under any pressure of time. The crew could have been in Old Crow 8 to 10 days earlier, yet, four weeks at the least are recommended when undertaking a tour of this kind.

  • River Classification: Grade 1-2 (no rapids)
  • Best time to travel: June to August
  • Nearest emergency communication: Dempster Highway, Old Crow (PLB)
  • Length: 12 km portage, 600 km waterway (50 km to Whitestone River, 120 km on Whitestone River down to the mouth of Miner River, 200 km from Miner River to Bell River, 200 km from Bell River to Old Crow).
  • Width: 5 to 250 meters
  • Time to allow: 25 days from Dempster Highway to Old Crow
  • Maps 1: N.T.S. 1: 250 000
    • Ogilvie River
    • Hart River
    • Porcupine River
    • Eagle River
    • Bell River
    • Old Crow
  • Maps 2: 1: 50.000 (Portage from Dempster to Whitestone)
    • 116 G/9
    • 116 G/16
    • 116 H/12
    • 116 H/13
  • Hazards: Remote wilderness, very difficult, long and arduous portage, long journey on the Rivers, swift water in many bends, logjams, sweepers, sandbars and boulders.
  • Directions: Via Dempster Highway, 56 km past Ogilvie Bridge

Recommended Stages

The starting point of the tour on the Dempster Highway can easily be found, it is about 56 km north of the Ogilvie Bridge. The Ogilvie River, which basically runs along the Highway to about 50 km past the Ogilvie Bridge, leaves the highway at that point and turns to the right (east). This is 7 km past an airfield on the right side of the Dempster Highway which is well marked and thus can’t be overlooked.

On the point where the Ogilvie River turns to the east the Dempster Highway begins to rise to the mountains. This point is easy to find because a creek which always has running water flows into the Ogilvie River there and is thus crossed under the highway. Then you must go on till you have reached the highest point of the highway, above the timber-line, where there is a deposit for the road gravel run by the road surveyors. This deposit is at about 100 m to the left of the highway and a gravel pass leads to it. This is exactly the starting point of the tour. To its left is the ridge or flat peak when looking NNW (Dempster Highway behind you). Four valleys stretch out in front of you then; the one in your line of sight and to the right of the starting point, being 4 km long. The second one borders on the first, extends at right angles to it in NNE direction and is again 4 km long. The third valley runs parallel to the first, is 3 km long and again borders at right angles to a valley parallel to the second one. The latter contains the first navigable creek where as the creeks of the three valleys mentioned before are too small and don´t have enough water to be navigated in summer.

The portage to the first navigable creek is therefore at about 12 km long, which means a footpath of 60 km because carrying all the proper equipment makes it necessary to walk the route five times. This march should – if possible – lead people along the creeks and valleys because it is important that water is available for the whole time. A well-trained group is able to do the route in 4 days.

The start of the journey on the water divide

1st stage
The first kilometer of the tour can easily be covered with no obstacles or trees standing in your way. Then you have to cross quite a steep slope overgrown with trees and bushes to reach the valley to the right. The best thing is to go as far as the creek and then along the creek as far as possible. After three kilometres there is a relatively open area to the left of the creek, which is only covered with moss and grass. You can’t miss this open area because it can clearly be recognized as such from the starting point of the tour. If you want to avoid camping in the woods, this is the only acceptable camping-place although the ground is relatively moist and contains numerous deep holes with so called “niggerheads” in between. Yet, there is a flat place for 2 or 3 tents, the creek is not far away and provides you with good drinking water.

Beating through the bush

2nd stage
Instead of following the creek it is best now to cross it and march in a slanting direction to the second valley. After one kilometer you reach a cutline which runs through the whole valley and makes orientation so easy that it is no longer necessary to mark the route with little coloured hunter flags. Following this cutline till it crosses the creek you reach a point which is quite apt to act as a camping-place for the night.

3rd and 4th stages
The 3rd and the 4th day stages of your tour lead along the aisle to the end of the valley. However, this march was not at all easy because there was no beaten path. Numerous holes, marshy country and “niggerheads” render the march difficult and involve the danger of breaking one’s leg. Yet, it is easier to follow the way described above than to walk along the right slope as we tried for one day.

Danny Hildebrand

5th and 6th stages
This aisle ends with the second valley, yet, there is a new one at right angels to Dempster. Before reaching the creek of the third valley you go towards the valley till the creek meets the steep slope. From that point on it is better to cover the following 3 km in the bed of the creek itself although it is very difficult with the creek having to little water for paddling at towing. Additionally, overturned trees block the creek, thus making navigation almost impossible. You can use the canoe as a means of transport for one quarter of the distance only; the other three quarters have to be walked. In spite of all these difficulties, this way is by far easier than the one through the bush; and there are also two fairly great sandbanks in the river-bed which offer two good camping-places.

The creek suddenly and quite astonishingly flows into another creek which runs through the fourth valley. Now it can nearly be regarded as a river because of the width of its bed. From now on you can go by canoe; only in some places is there the need to tow.

Camping on the river

Canoeing

The wide creek makes paddling eventful as well as easy. Calm deep water changes to fast water in numerous small turns. There are no rapids, yet, you must take care of certain obstacles like trees or bushes (logjams) in the turns. Every now and then there are swells and back eddies. There are a variety of camping-places, the water is clear, containing a lot of fish, above all graylings, sometimes catfish and pike.

All the tributary creeks shown on the map were dried up during our tour; a few kilometres before the creek flows into the Whitestone River there are two tributary creeks (the one is coming from the right, the other immediately afterwards from the left side) which had enough water. Fishing was splendid there, too (grayling, she fish, pike).

More than enough Pike

After 50 km this creek flows into the Whitestone River which comes from the left side out of a wide valley. There is a back eddy, but it is not dangerous. Right where the two rivers join, there is a huge sand-bank on the left side offering good camping-places as well as good places for fishing (she-fish). From this point on you go along the Whitestone River for 120 km till the Miner River flows into it. The Whitestone also has clear as well as fast water. Its bottom is either sandy or covered with light pebbles. Again you won’t have to cope with rapids, yet, there are many narrow channels with swells in the turns, as well as obstacles like trunks or bushes you must take care of. Although there are a variety of fish. It is much easier to catch pike and catfish too(bottom fish). You can choose between a lot of camp sites; best are sand-banks which protect you from mosquito’s and unexpected appearances of bears.

The tributary creeks are difficult to find because they often flow into dead branches of the Whitestone River and have little water in midsummer. Whitestone Village no longer exists, just a few dilapidated log-houses can be found on the left side of the river a couple of meters above the site where the village once was. Shortly before the junction with the Miner River are a few islands so that the river, now being relatively wide, shows some channels, making the choice difficult with the low water-level.

As the Whitestone River and the Miner River rise in the Ogilvie Mountains, the Miner has clear water and heavy current which makes it appear more gigantic than the Whitestone which flows more sluggishly. At the junction there is a huge gravel-bank which is not good for camping because of its large pebbles. Yet, 3 km farther there is an ideal camping-place on the left side just before tjoining with the Cody Creek and there is the best possibility of catching graylings. The river then grows wider and wider and the velocity of flow steadily decreases. The water remains clear, but fishing is reduced to catching pike which can be found in great number.

Caribou at the Bell River Mouth

The following part offers only a few good camping-places because sand-banks are lacking, the shore is muddy and the land is characterized by shrub and marshy meadows. Five miles above the junction with the Little Porcupine River there is an old Indian camp used by lumber-jacks from Old Crow with a comfortable hut. Further there are some cabins, but they are hardly seen from the river and often very desolate, that is they can’t even be recommended as make-shift beds. From the junction with the Bell River onwards the velocity of flow increases slightly but the clarity decreases because the Bell River brings a lot of sediment with it. Thus, there are various sand-banks which again offer better camping-places. There are even some camps and cabins partly used on the shore.

During late summer and autumn you can find a lot of caribou in the area between the confluence with the Bell River and Old Crow. There are not many difficulties when paddling along the whole Porcupine River. Even if the water-level is extremely low you can choose between many shallow channels running between a lot of sand-banks.


Contact Form


    Landzugang zum Whitestone River in Kanada

    Der Landzugang zum oberen Whitestone River im Yukon Territory in Kanada (Explore The Backcountry)

    Orientierungshilfe für Austrainierte, die sich durch den absolut unberührten Busch und ohne Beihilfe eines Helikopters die namenlosen Quellwasser des oberen Whitestone Rivers/Yukon-Territory erlaufen möchten, um schließlich über den Porcupine- und den Yukon River die Beringsee zu erreichen (nicht für jedermann geeignet).

    Danny Hildebrand

    Dr. Bruno Benischek

    von Danny Hildebrand und Dr. Bruno Benischek
    Der Whitestone River und der obere Porcupine River sind ideale Flüsse für relativ erfahrene Wildnispaddler, welche einerseits die unberührte Wildnis suchen, andererseits aber körperlich in so guter Verfassung sein müssen, dass sie den schweren 6 bis 7-Tage-Marsch durch den kanadischen Busch bis zu den Quellgewässern des Whitestone Rivers mit der gesamten Ausrüstung durchstehen können. Die besondere Gefahr dieser Tour besteht darin, dass man sich für gut 4 Wochen in einer absoluten unberührten und menschenlosen Wildnis befindet. Hilfe von außen kann nicht erwartet werden. Aus diesem Grunde empfiehlt es sich dringend ein PLB mitzuführen, was es zu der Zeit, als wir die Tour 1985 unternahmen, auf dem freien Markt noch nicht gab.

    Weiterhin empfiehlt es sich, die Reise mit 4 Leuten anzugehen und keinesfalls Anfänger daran teilhaben zu lassen. Dem erfahrenen Wildniswanderer und Kanufahrer, der sorgfältig vorgeplant hat, wird sich jedoch eine Fülle unauslöschlicher Erlebnisse bieten und letztlich die Genugtuung bringen, etwas Außergewöhnliches erlebt zu haben. Klares und zumeist schnelles Wasser ohne eigentliche Stromschnellen, unberührte Wildnis, reichlich Wildtiere und in der Sommerzeit oft trockenes Festlandswetter, werden das Unternehmen auszeichnen.

    Eine Zweimann-Crew (wir) mit einem 16-Fuß-Kanu benötigte 33 Tage, um vom Dempster Highway bis nach Old Crow zu gelangen, allerdings ohne Zeitdruck. Die Crew hätte die Strecke auch in 23 bis 25 Tagen bewältigen können. Um ohne Stress und mit heiler Seele die Marsch- und Flussstrecke “abzuarbeiten”, sind jedoch 4 Wochen Zeit empfehlenswert.

    Beschreibung

    • Wasserschwierigkeitsgrad: 1 – 2 (keine Stromschnellen)
    • Beste Reisezeit: Juni bis August
    • Nächste Orte für Hilfe: Dempster Highway und Old Crow
    • Länge: 12 km Portage durch den Busch. 600 km Wasserweg (50 km bis zum Whitestone River, 120 km auf dem Whitestone River bis zur Mündung des Miner River, 200 km von der Einmündung des Miners auf dem Porcupine River bis zum Bell River, 180 km vom Bell bis nach Old Crow). Bei diesen Angaben handelt es sich um Flusskilometer!
    • Zeit:  25 bis 30 Tage
    • Kartenmaterial 1:  1: 250.000
      • Ogilvie River
      • Hart River
      • Porcupine River
      • Eagle River
      • Bell River
      • Old Crow
    • Kartenmaterial 2:  1: 50.000 (für die Portage und zum Whitestone River)
      • 116 G/9
      • 116 G/16
      • 116 H/12
      • 116 H/13
    • Gefahren
      • Lange und mühsame Anfangsportage durch wegloses Gelände.
      • Keine Möglichkeit Hilfe von außen zu bekommen (außer PLB).
      • Starke Verblockungen durch Büsche und Baumstämme auf den zuführenden Bächen und dem Flüsschen bis zum Whitestone River.
      • Schwälle und starke Kehrwasser.
    • Zugang: Dempster Highway 56 km nördlich der Ogilvie Bridge (Schotterdepot des Straßenbautrupps für den Highway)

     

    Empfohlene Marschetappen für die Portage

    Der Ausgangspunkt für die Portage ist leicht zu finden. Etwa 50 km nach der Ogilvie Bridge verlässt der Ogilvie River, der bis zu dieser Stelle mehr oder weniger parallel zum Dempster Highway verläuft, diesen, und wendet sich nach Osten. Dieser Punkt liegt etwa 7 km nördlich eines Airfields auf der rechten Seite des Highways, welches gut gekennzeichnet ist.

    An dieser Stelle unterquert ein Bach, der immer Wasser führt, den Highway von West nach Ost. Hier beginnt der Highway in nördlicher Richtung anzusteigen. Oberhalb der Baumgrenze, nach etwa 6 km, sieht man links das große Schotterdepot des Straßenbaus liegen. Etwa 100 Meter weit führt ein Schotterweg zur Westseite des Depots, und genau dort liegt der Ausgangspunkt für die Tour und damit der Beginn der Portage hinunter in die fernen Täler. Von hier aus blickt man, über einen flachen halblinks liegenden baumlosen Bergrücken hinweg, in vier westlich liegende Täler. Etwa 100 Meter halbrechts ist der erste kleine Einschnitt zu finden, der bereits Wasser führt. Alle Wasser, die hier in westliche Richtung talwärts fließen, landen letztendlich im Porcupine River, denn hier oben auf dem Hochplateau befindet sich die Wasserscheide. Folgt man nun diesen Rinnsalen durch die nächsten 3 Täler, kommt man zwangsweise an paddelbares Fließgewässer. Es ist ratsam, diese Rinnsale nicht großräumig zu verlassen, da sie die Versorgung mit Trink- und Gebrauchswasser für die kommenden Tage sichern.

    Das 4. und letzte Tal beherbergt schließlich einen paddelbaren Bach von bereits 5 bis 10 m Breite, der bis hinunter zum Whitestone River führt, in der Karte jedoch ohne Namen zu finden ist. Mit dem Fernglas ist dieser Bachlauf an einer Reihe auffallend hoher Fichten zu erkennen, welche seine Ufer säumen. Die davor liegenden 3 Talbäche sind nicht befahrbar, führen jedoch oft für wenige Meter Wasser, so dass kurzes Treideln möglich ist. Die Gesamtstrecke bis zum 4.Tal, also bis zum ersten, echten Paddelwasser, liegt etwa bei 12 km. Eine gut trainierte Truppe kann diese Strecke (je nach Ausrüstung) in 3 bis 6 Tagen schaffen (wir hatten 4 Rucksäcke a. 25 kg, das Kanu und Gewehre dabei, mussten jede Strecke also 5 Mal gehen und benötigten daher 7 Tage). Es ist empfehlenswert die einzelnen Tragestrecken im Abstand so zu legen, dass möglichst nicht mehr als 200 Meter zwischen ihnen liegen, sonst läuft man Gefahr, dass eventueller Bärenbesuch die Lebensmittelplanung für die nächsten 4 Wochen durcheinander bringt. Da es in dieser Wildnis keinen ausgetretenen Trail gibt, ist es zudem dringend empfehlenswert die jeweiligen Hinundherstrecken mit orange leuchtenden Jäger-Bändchen (in Kanada bei jedem Outfitter zu bekommen) zu markieren. So findet man schnell von Punkt zu Punkt und vertut seine kostbare Zeit nicht mit nutzloser Trailsucherei. Empfehlenswert sind hüfthohe Gummistiefel für die Feuchtpassagen.

    Touranfang, auf der Wasserscheide

    1. Etappe
    Vom Ausgangspunkt an der Bergkuppe ist das Gelände hinunter ins Tal für etwa einen Kilometer recht gut und relativ leicht zu begehen, da sich weder Bäume noch sonstige Hindernisse dort befinden. Nach dieser Stecke muss man nach rechts hinüber auf einen ziemlich steilen Hang wechseln, der sehr dicht mit Sträuchern und Bäumen bewachsen ist. Es ist jedoch sinnvoll, sich möglichst dicht an dem tiefeingeschnittenen Bächlein zu halten, welches oft kaum sichtbar, doch wenigstens hörbar, etwa handbreit den Hochmoorboden in einer Tiefe von etwa 50 cm durchschneidet.

    Nach etwa 3 km liegt linksseitig eine offene Fläche, welche hauptsächlich von Moos und Gras bewachsen ist. Sie kann nicht verfehlt werden, da sie gut sichtbar und auch schon von oben, dem Ausgangspunkt der Tour, als grünes, freies Areal auszumachen ist. Wenn man nicht im dichten Wald kampieren will, ist dieses die einzig akzeptable Lagermöglichkeit, obwohl der Boden ziemlich feucht und mit zahlreichen Mulden versehen ist, welche durch die typischen Moorgrasbüschel (sogenannte “Niggerheads”) entstanden sind. Für 3 bis 4 Zelte finden sich jedoch halbwegs vernünftige Lagerplätze. Das Baumwerk ringsherum ist zwar bis zu 100 Jahre alt, in der Regel jedoch nicht höher als 1 bis 3 Meter (Permafrost). Das tief eingeschnittene Bächlein befindet sich in unmittelbarer Nähe und führt auch in den warmen Sommermonaten gutes Trinkwasser.

    Durch den Busch (7 Tage für 12 Kilometer Luftlinie)

    2. Etappe
    In diesem Fall ist es nun besser das Bächlein zu überqueren und ihm nicht weiter zu folgen, sondern schräg in Richtung des zweiten Tals zu marschieren. Man gelangt dabei schon nach knapp einem Kilometer auf eine sogenannte Cutline (Schneise). Man folgt dieser gut begehbaren Waldschneise solange, bis sie den Bach wieder erreicht hat. Da auf dieser Strecke die Orientierung relativ leicht ist, ist das Markieren des Weges mit Bändchen nicht vonnöten. Dieser Kreuzungspunkt ist gut geeignet als 2. Lagerplatz.

    3. und 4. Etappe
    Beide Etappen verlaufen auf der weiterführenden Cutline bis zum Ende des Tals, doch ist die Stecke von der Orientierung her zwar nicht so schwierig wie die Anfangspassage, birgt jedoch durch “Niggerheads”, Sumpfpassagen und Wurzelwerk die Gefahr eines Knöchel- oder Beinbruchs.

    Danny Hildebrand

    5. und 6. Etappe
    Am Ende des 2. Tales endet nun die Cutline. An dieser Stelle schneidet eine neue Schneise im rechten Winkel den Weg. Folgt man dieser Linie in westlicher Richtung, erreicht man das 3. Tal und bald darauf einen Punkt, wo der nun zunehmend größer werdende Bach an einen steilen Berghang herankommt. Ab hier sollte man das Bachbett nicht mehr verlassen, sondern es als feuchten Trail stromab benutzen (Gummistiefel). Es ist eine etwa 3 km lange Strecke, die zwar äußerst schwierig, jedoch wesentlich leichter zu bewältigen ist, als der nahezu undurchdringliche Urwald der näheren Umgebung. Durch Biberdämme und andere Verblockungen staut sich das Wasser hin und wieder so auf, dass das Kanu für einige Meter zum Schwimmen gebracht werden kann (oh Freude)! Durch querliegende Baumstämme ist es jedoch zwangsweise erforderlich, das Bachbett öfter für kurze Zeit zu verlassen. Der Bach, dessen Bett nun schon mehrfach die Breite von bis zu 10 Metern erreicht hat, bietet auf zunehmenden Sandbänken gute Lagerplätze für die Nacht. Vollkommen überraschend kommt dann die Mündung dieses Creeks in den großen Bach unter den großen Bäumen, der durch das 4. und letzte Tal der Laufstrecke fließt und schon als Flüsschen bezeichnet werden kann. Dieses Flüsschen, welches nun hinunter bis zum Whitestone River führt, ist bis zu 10 Meter breit und kann, mit wenigen Ausnahmen und entsprechender Vorsicht, hervorragend bepaddelt werden.

    Lagerfeuer am Whitestone River

    Flussfahrt

    Das Paddeln in diesem namenlosen Fluss ist abwechslungsreich und relativ einfach. Ruhiges, tiefes Wasser wechselt sich ab mit flachen, schnellen Passagen, Presswasser, Kehrwassern und engen Kurven, ist jedoch ohne Stromschnellen. Besonders achten muss man auf plötzlich auftauchende Hindernisse wie überhängende Bäume und Büsche (Sweeper). Das Wasser ist glasklar, und es gibt zahlreiche Sandbänke mit guten Lagerplätzen. Fische gibt es reichlich: Äsche (Arctic Grayling), Shefish, Hecht und Wels). Die, auf der Karte eingezeichneten Nebenbäche können ausgetrocknet sein, die letzten beiden, kurz vor der Einmündung in den Whitestone River allerdings (links und rechts), bieten sehr gute Angelmöglichkeiten. Dieser Punkt ist nach etwa 50 Kilometern erreicht. An der Einmündung in den von links kommenden Whitestone River, gibt es ein starkes Kehrwasser, welches jedoch problemlos passiert werden kann. Links, also von der Mündung stromauf, befindet sich eine kilometerlange Sandbank, die hervorragende Lagermöglichkeiten bietet. Angeln im Mündungsbereich ist vielversprechend (Shefish).

    Bis zur Einmündung in den Miner River sind es nun noch etwa 120 Flusskilometer. Der, an sich harmlos dahinfließende, Whitestone River ist streckenweise doch rasant, ebenfalls glasklar und macht durch die weißen Steine auf dem Flussgrund seinem Namen alle Ehre. Stromschnellen gibt es auf der ganzen Strecke nicht. Lediglich einige unübersichtliche und schnelle Kurven mit entsprechenden Kehrwassern und diverse Log Jams mahnen zur Vorsicht. Ende Juli findet man an den Waldrändern Himbeeren und Johannisbeeren in Hülle und Fülle. Außerdem gibt es alle Arten von Bodenfrüchten wie Moos- und Heidelbeeren sowie hervorragende Pilze. Der Fluss ist voll mit Fischen. Um Hechten mit abgerissenen Angelhaken im Maul einen qualvollen Tod zu ersparen, benutzt man grundsätzlich ein Stahlvorfach (der Hecht hat messerscharfe Zähne), auch wenn man auf Äschen geht (sie beißen trotzdem)!

    Der Fluss bietet auf seiner gesamten Strecke ausgezeichnete Lagerplätze mit ausreichend Feuerholz. Wilder Schnittlauch, auf vorwiegend blitzsauberen Sandbänken, rundet die abendlichen Mahlzeiten ab. Die übersichtlichen Sandbänke sind aus mücken- und bärentechnischen Gründen als Lagerplätze empfehlenswert. Einmündende Bäche sind oft schwer zu entdecken, da sie häufig, für den Paddler unsichtbar, in tote Arme einmünden und im Sommer wenig Wasser führen.

    Reichlich Hechte

    Das in der Karte eingetragene Whitestone Village besteht nicht mehr. Knapp oberhalb der ehemaligen Siedlung stößt man auf ein paar verfallene Blockhütten. Kurz vor der Einmündung in den Miner River befinden sich einige Inseln in dem nun breiteren Flussbett, so dass sich mehrere Kanäle gebildet haben. Bei Niedrigwasser kann es daher schwierig sein, die richtige Passage mit ausreichend Wasser unter dem Kiel zu finden. Der Miner River entspringt wie der Whitestone River in den Ogilvie Mountains, ist daher genau so klar und kommt mit einer starken Strömung von links herangeschossen. Ab hier heißt der Fluss nun Porcupine River.

    Die riesige Sandbank in der Einmündung taugt wegen ihrer großen Steine nicht als Lagerplatz, man findet jedoch etwa 3 km weiter stromab, kurz vor der Einmündung des Cody Creeks, auf der linken Flussseite eine ebenso große Sandbank mit hervorragenden Lagerplätzen und guten Angelmöglichkeiten auf Graylings.Der Porcupine River wird nun ständig breiter und die Strömungsgeschwindigkeit verringert sich zusehends. Das Wasser bleibt klar. Die Angelmöglichkeiten beschränken sich mehr und mehr auf Hechte, welche allerdings reichlich vorhanden sind. Etwa 8 km oberhalb der Einmündung des Little Porcupine R. steht ein relativ gut erhaltenes Cabin der Old-Crow-Indianer am hohen, rechten Ufer und ist nur ganz selten von ihnen bewohnt. Auf der nachfolgenden Flusstrecke gibt es noch mehrere Cabins, die jedoch verfallen und nicht einmal mehr als Not-Camps geeignet sind. Für die Weiterreise von dem Camp der Old-Crow-Indianer sollte man frühzeitig aufbrechen, da die folgende Tagesstrecke nur nasse grüne oder schlammige Uferstücke, jedoch keine geeigneten Sandbänke zum Lagern bietet und die Suche erst sehr spät abends zum Erfolg führen kann.

    Caribous an der Bell-River-Mündung

    Vor der Einmündung des Bell Rivers steht rechts auf dem hohen Ufer ein ganz passables Cabin. In der Regel wird der Fluss ab hier nun trübe, da der einmündende Bell River meistens sehr viel Sediment aus den Eagle Plains herantransportiert. Mitte August kann man in diesem Bereich oft größere, nach Süden ziehende, Caribou-Herden beobachten. Von hier bis Old Crow findet man ausreichend gute Lagerplätze am Fuße der sanften Hügelketten, die den Fluss jetzt auf viele Meilen begleiten. Auch Sandbänke sind in ausreichender Menge vorhanden, doch sollte man tunlichst vermeiden in unmittelbarer Wassernähe zu zelten, da der Porcupine River durch Regenfälle in den Quellgebieten für sein plötzliches Ansteigen (bis zu einem Meter) hinreichend bekannt ist.

    Bis Old Crow hinunter begegnet man nun immer mal wieder indianischen Einwohnern des Ortes, die auf der Jagd sind und auch die gelegentlichen Cabins an beiden Seiten des Flusses bewohnen. In Old Crow kann man sich problemlos mit kleinen Propellermaschinen ausfliegen lassen. Die Kanus jedoch müssen vor Ort bleiben…